Osceola County Historical Society Blog

Anza Bast

Recent Posts

Ernest P. "Kayo" Murphy

Posted by Anza Bast on Nov 7, 2017 9:00:00 AM

 As a boxer in high school, he was always the smallest of the group.  The nickname “Kayo”, little brother of cartoon character Moon Mullins, was bestowed upon him.  He was born in Brooklyn, Texas; on Christmas Eve in 1916, to A.J. and Florence Murphy and had six brothers and two sisters.  The family moved to Kissimmee when Kayo was in second grade.  His childhood was spent attending local schools, enjoying summers at the old swimming hole on Mill Slough and climbing up trees to watch movies in an open air theater on the corner of Monument Avenue and the railroad tracks.  He later graduated from St. Leo Preparatory College where he excelled in sports and was inducted into the St. Leo College Athletic Hall of Fame.

Read More

Topics: History, Osceola County History, Ernest P. "Kayo" Murphy, Veteran

Historic Teacher Spotlight: Emma Viola Yowell

Posted by Anza Bast on Oct 12, 2017 9:00:00 AM

The replica schoolhouse at the Pioneer Village at Shingle Creek is typical of the style that Emma Viola Yowell may have taught in.  Born in Illinois about 1862, she began her teaching career there in 1886.  After moving to Florida in 1888, Emma taught at the Athens School in Polk County, followed by a transfer to Davenport in 1889.  The move to Osceola County in 1890 was the beginning of Emma’s fifty years of service to our community.

Read More

Topics: teacherspotlight, Replica Schoolhouse, Dine with the Departed, Pioneer Village at Shingle Creek, Osceola County Historical Society

The Monts De Oca Family

Posted by Anza Bast on Sep 7, 2017 4:03:38 PM

Translations of the name Monts De Oca vary as do stories regarding the origin of the family.  Ancestry.com tells us it is “ Topographic name from a range of mountains forming the watershed between the rivers Ebro and Duero in northern Spain, named with the plural of monte ‘mountain’ and oca ‘goose’.”  The Urban Dictionary defines it as “large hills with an oak forest on top” or “large hills with geese on top”.

Read More

Topics: History, Monts De Oca Family, Hispanic Heritage Month

War Cake Recipe

Posted by Anza Bast on Aug 25, 2017 9:00:00 AM

When World War I broke out, many food items were rationed, so there was a need for economical recipes using ingredients readily available.  This one appeared in a cook book sold for $1.00 to benefit the Red Cross and American Fund for French Wounded.  It was also referred to as War Cake.

Read More

Topics: History, War Cake Recipe, 100 years ago

Company B Reunion

Posted by Anza Bast on Aug 3, 2017 9:00:00 AM

Company B 2nd Florida Infantry unit has been featured in previous blogs, but have you wondered what happened to these men?   News articles discovered in the Osceola County Historical Society archives tell of a reunion held by the “Border Boys”, an appropriate name for the U.S. Army horsemen who crossed the Rio Grande from Texas in 1916 to fight the Mexican bandit, Pancho Villa.  In the fall of 1969 invitations were sent to twenty of the surviving members, thirteen still resided in Kissimmee and two in St. Cloud, while others lived in California.  Fifteen or sixteen reunions had previously been held on the ranch of Jennings Overstreet, whose father Mack was one of the “Border Boys”.

Read More

Topics: Osceola County History, Company B, 2nd Infantry

Downtown St. Cloud Fire of 1917

Posted by Anza Bast on Jul 28, 2017 7:30:00 AM

Between twelve and one o’clock on the night of July 28, 1917, fire broke out in the W.A. Drawdy store room on Pennsylvania Avenue in St. Cloud, Florida.  The fire swept down both sides of Pennsylvania Avenue, affecting eighteen businesses before it was brought under control. 

Read More

Topics: St. Cloud, 100 years ago in Osceola County, Fire

American Red Cross: The Kissimmee Chapter

Posted by Anza Bast on Jun 22, 2017 9:00:00 AM

 Many school children learned that Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross in Washington, DC on May 21, 1881. She heard of the Swiss global Red Cross network while visiting Europe following the Civil War.

 With the beginning of World War I, the organization experienced phenomenal growth. There were 107 chapters in 1904; by 1918, 3,864 chapters had been organized.

Read More

Topics: Osceola County History, Graystone Hotel, American Red Cross

St. Cloud Sugar Mill

Posted by Anza Bast on May 29, 2017 8:30:00 AM

The Disston Land Company stopped meeting the notes on the mortgage of the St. Cloud Sugar Mill after July 1895 and the sugar mill laid dormant between 1897, and 1901. In 1900, all the mill machinery was sold to Sabal Bros. of Jacksonville but not actually removed from the area. In January, 1901, it was resold to the Redo Brothers of Mexico for a reputed $75,000. John Garrity, who had been in charge of the machinery, serving mainly as a watchman, resigned from the Disston operations and was hired by the Mexican company to supervise the machinery’s relocation. He crated and marked each piece of machinery, which filled between 50 to 60 railroad cars and weighed between 800-1000 tons. It was transported via railroad to Tampa, loaded aboard a Dutch schooner which set out for the long trip around Cape Horn to Mexico. There had been reports the vessel sunk near Cuba, and later near Cape Horn but an outbreak of smallpox on board had forced the captain to land at a small harbor in Chile where the crew was quarantined, thus delaying the journey.

Read More

Topics: History, Osceola County History, Hamilton Disston Sugar Plantation and Mill, History Month

The Clock and China Museum

Posted by Anza Bast on May 18, 2017 8:30:00 AM

After selling their haberdashery business in Chicago, Emanuel J. “Manny” and Theresa Budinger moved to St. Cloud, Florida in 1944. The Budingers established the Clock and China Museum at 1725 Missouri Avenue in St. Cloud a few years later. They began to collect clocks from all over the world and a museum was established, with a special building to house Theresa’s rare china collection. They charged no admission fee and refused any monetary donations. Theresa realized that with such a large elderly population in the community, St. Cloud should have a hospital so she decided that by accepting donations from the visitors, she could raise funds for this purpose. Once the St. Cloud Hospital Foundation was chartered, clubs and organizations held benefit affairs, giving proceeds to the Foundation. Groundbreaking was held in October 1957 and the hospital officially opened its doors on March 19, 1964.

Read More

Topics: Around Osceola County, History Month, Clock and China Museum

Narcoosee Shaker Colony

Posted by Anza Bast on May 11, 2017 8:15:00 AM

The Shakers, a short name taken by the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, trace their beliefs to the early traditions of the church and more particularly to a 17th century group of French Protestants known as Camisards or Prophets. They were driven from France to England and disappeared from view but did pass on their beliefs to a group of Quakers who were attracted by the similar faith.

 

Read More

Topics: History, Osceola County History, Shaker Colony, The Olive Branch

About this Blog

The Osceola County Historical Society is focused on preserving Osceola County’s rich, cultural history while sharing it with others. This blog is perfect for just that. 

Remember, here you can find information on:

  • Osceola County History
  • Pioneer Families
  • Events at the Welcome Center and History Museum
  • Much, much more!

Subscribe to Email Updates

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all