Osceola County Historical Society Blog

It’s All in the Details

Posted by Kayla Smith on Feb 15, 2018 9:00:00 AM

Fashion seems to be a revolving door. A particular “fad” may be popular for a time, but will surely be replaced by another. However, that fad will probably find its way back into popularity a few decades later. One aspect that never seems to go out of style, is the attention to detail. Adding specific elements to a garment can give it an extra flair, or make a relatively bland piece look extraordinary.

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Topics: Artifact Spotlight, History, Osceola County Welcome Center and HIstory Museum, Free Admission, Osceola County Historical Society, Fashion Rewind Opening Reception, Fashion Rewind Temporary Exhibit, Fashion

Historical Wedding Traditions – Wedding Cakes Part 2

Posted by Maggie Ferrara on Feb 8, 2018 9:00:00 AM

With the opening of our 1800s Replica Historic Church available for Weddings and Vow Renewals, we wanted to take a look into many common wedding traditions still performed.

Have you ever wondered why the Bride wears a white dress? Or why we eat a tiered wedding cake? Or why the Bride tosses her bouquet? Or why we host a bridal shower?

Where did these traditions come from? Why do we do them?

Join us for a multi-part mini-series as we uncover the history behind many common Wedding Traditions!

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Topics: History, Venue Rentals, Wedding Traditions, Wedding Cakes

John Carroll: The "Big Boss"

Posted by Anza Bast on Jan 25, 2018 9:00:00 AM

Born in Bedford, Ohio, John Carroll worked for Ohio oil companies until 1936 when he became manager of his father’s 55,000 acre Carrollton Ranch in Deer Park.  In 1947, he became Vice President of the First National Bank of Kissimmee, retiring in 1975 as Chairman of the Board.  John was one of the sixteen horsemen who rode in the inaugural parade for Governor Spessard Holland in 1941.  He was a charter member of the Silver Spurs quadrille, helped organize the Silver Spurs Riding Club and was its first “Big Boss” in 1942.  At the age of 81, John was honored by being named “Coca Cola Cowboy” in 1988 by the Club.  Bestowed annually since 1982, the honor was given to an Osceola County resident who had worked to promote the rodeo and its way of life.  After receiving the honor, he replied “You don’t know what it means to a Yankee to be accepted like I have been.”

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Topics: History, Osceola County History, Silver Spurs Rodeo, John Carroll

The Hilliard Family

Posted by Anza Bast on Dec 14, 2017 9:00:00 AM

James Kinchen Hilliard was born in Coffee County, Georgia on December 17, 1852.  He lost his father in 1863 during the War Between the States.  Perhaps to ease the burden of his mother, who was left to rear some of his eleven siblings, James headed to Texas at the age of fourteen. For nine years he roamed the central west encountering Indians and buffalo and gathering tales of his experiences.

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Topics: Pioneer Family, History, Dine with the Departed, Osceola County Historical Society

Ernest P. "Kayo" Murphy

Posted by Anza Bast on Nov 7, 2017 9:00:00 AM

 As a boxer in high school, he was always the smallest of the group.  The nickname “Kayo”, little brother of cartoon character Moon Mullins, was bestowed upon him.  He was born in Brooklyn, Texas; on Christmas Eve in 1916, to A.J. and Florence Murphy and had six brothers and two sisters.  The family moved to Kissimmee when Kayo was in second grade.  His childhood was spent attending local schools, enjoying summers at the old swimming hole on Mill Slough and climbing up trees to watch movies in an open air theater on the corner of Monument Avenue and the railroad tracks.  He later graduated from St. Leo Preparatory College where he excelled in sports and was inducted into the St. Leo College Athletic Hall of Fame.

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Topics: History, Osceola County History, Ernest P. "Kayo" Murphy, Veteran

Shingle Creek Monster: A catfish or more?

Posted by Kayleigh Heister on Oct 26, 2017 10:36:02 AM

 Forty years ago, on November eighth,  people in the Shingle Creek area may have had a real monster on their hands. This story of the Shingle Creek Monster (pictured in this blog) was the headline for the Osceola-Polk section of the Sentinel Star. I followed Frank Carroll's footsteps when writing about this mysterious creature, nicknamed the “Loch Shingle Monster”, which doesn't flow like the Loch Ness Monster.  Many  people that lived in the area brushed off the beliefs that it could have been something other than a very large catfish.  Many made it a personal goal to catch the moster of Shingle Creek, but they all came up empty handed.  

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Topics: History, Around Osceola County, Shingle Creek Monster Catfish

The Monts De Oca Family

Posted by Anza Bast on Sep 7, 2017 4:03:38 PM

Translations of the name Monts De Oca vary as do stories regarding the origin of the family.  Ancestry.com tells us it is “ Topographic name from a range of mountains forming the watershed between the rivers Ebro and Duero in northern Spain, named with the plural of monte ‘mountain’ and oca ‘goose’.”  The Urban Dictionary defines it as “large hills with an oak forest on top” or “large hills with geese on top”.

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Topics: History, Monts De Oca Family, Hispanic Heritage Month

$80,000 Cultural Facility Grant awarded to OCHS for 1800s Replica General Store

Posted by Rachel McIntee on Aug 30, 2017 12:59:04 PM

The Osceola County Historical Society received an $80,000 Cultural Facility Grant through the Florida Department of State Division of Cultural Affairs. The organization will use the state funds from this grant to continue the next phase of the expansion of the Pioneer Village at Shingle Creek (2491 Babb Rd., Kissimmee, FL 34746), which will include the construction and furnishing of a late-1800s replica General Store. The replica General Store is scheduled to be completed this fall and open during the 26th Annual Pioneer Day on November 11, 2017. 

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Topics: History, Pioneer Village at Shingle Creek, Expansion, 1800s Replica General Store

War Cake Recipe

Posted by Anza Bast on Aug 25, 2017 9:00:00 AM

When World War I broke out, many food items were rationed, so there was a need for economical recipes using ingredients readily available.  This one appeared in a cook book sold for $1.00 to benefit the Red Cross and American Fund for French Wounded.  It was also referred to as War Cake.

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Topics: History, War Cake Recipe, 100 years ago

Toho WaterWorks Summer Camp

Posted by Krystal McIntee on Aug 11, 2017 12:20:53 PM

 Toho Water Authority plays a huge part in the lives of local students in Osceola County. Over the summer, Toho offered their Toho WaterWorks Summer Camp, which ran from July 17, 2017 to July 21, 2017 to about 20 middle school students. Each day, the campers were able to learn about the importance of water through hands-on experiments, group building activities, and tours of various facilities.

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Topics: History, Around Osceola County, Summer Camp, Toho Water Authority

About this Blog

The Osceola County Historical Society is focused on preserving Osceola County’s rich, cultural history while sharing it with others. This blog is perfect for just that. 

Remember, here you can find information on:

  • Osceola County History
  • Pioneer Families
  • Events at the Welcome Center and History Museum
  • Much, much more!

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